Shooting leases and shooting agreements

To secure your shooting opportunity, BASC strongly recommends that you take out a lease or shooting agreement with your landlord.

This may seem a little over the top for a small or informal shoot – but having a written agreement in place protects both you and your landlord.

With a written agreement, each party knows exactly what is expected and will help to avoid any misunderstandings.

For further information contact the Game and Gundog department.

BASC, working with a respected lawyer in the world of shooting have drafted two suggested shooting agreements.

One is for a typical shoot over farmland for example where you may wish to secure the shooting rights for 12 months or more.

The other is a suggested format for an agreement between a group of travelling guns and an sporting agent, or anyone else who is selling a days shooting.

BASC have drafted a template for permission for members undertaking pest control. This form can be used where no money is changing hands and its scope is for pest birds and mammals. It is equally applicable for deer control as it is for rabbit and woodpigeon control.

This is NOT intended to be compulsory, but simply to help members. Its value is that you can immediately show that you have permission to be on the land with your firearm to control pests.

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