Lead and Non-Lead Shot

BASC Statement on Lead Shot

At BASC our arguments are backed by solid, scientific evidence and we refuse to countenance any decisions proposed by policy-makers, regulators or others that are not soundly evidence-based.

An attack on shooters will be seen as an attack on the countryside itself.

And as we provide clear evidence to support our case we will expect those who seek to restrict any aspect of shooting to do the same. They must back their claims with hard evidence, and this is particularly important in contentious areas such as the use of lead shot.

Let me make BASC’s position on lead totally clear: no sound evidence, no change.

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Restrictions on Lead Shot

Since Westminster signed the African-Eurasian Waterbird Agreement (AEWA) (November 1999) it is binding throughout the UK, but its implementation is a matter for the devolved governments. In England the lead shot regulations ban the use of lead shot over all foreshore, over specified SSSIs, and for the shooting of all ducks and geese, coot and moorhen – wherever they occur. The Welsh Assembly introduced similar regulations in September 2002. Scotland’s regulations came into force at the end of March 2005 and Northern Ireland came into force in September 2009.

England

In England the lead shot regulations ban the use of lead shot over all foreshore, over specified SSSIs, and for the shooting of all ducks and geese, coot and moorhen, wherever they occur. Click the links below for the English regulations.

The Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2003

The Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2002

The Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (England) Regulations 1999

Wales

In Wales the lead shot regulations are based closely on the English approach. Click the link below for the Welsh regulations.

The Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (Wales) Regulations 2002

Scotland

In Scotland the lead shot regulations are based around the RAMSAR definition of wetlands. Click the link below for the Scottish regulations.

The Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) (Scotland) (No.2) Regulations 2004

Click the link below for a practical guide on how the law works in Scotland.

A Practical Guide to the Lead Shot Regulations in Scotland

Northern Ireland

In Northern Ireland the lead shot regulations are based on the Scottish approach and prohibit the use of lead shot on or over any area of wetland for any shooting activity. Wetlands are defined as, regardless of size, any areas of foreshore, marsh, fen, peatland with standing water, regularly or seasonally flooded fields, and other water sources whether they be natural or man-made, static or flowing, fresh, brackish or salt. Click the link below for the Northern Ireland regulations.

The Environmental Protection (Restriction on Use of Lead Shot) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2009

Compliance with the lead shot regulations

All the UK’s major shooting organisations have come together in a campaign to combat the threat to lead ammunition. Their message is simple: if you want to keep lead, keep to the law.

Click here for more information

BASC Policy on Lead Ammunition

BASC confirms its position with regard to lead ammunition: no sound evidence, no change. Any regulation must be thoroughly justified by the science, level of risk and quantified using sound evidence, delivered through rigorous and robust process. This must comply with the Principles of Good Regulation. This will ensure that social, environmental and economic consequences are taken fully into account.

BASC recognises that there are risks to humans and wildlife from lead, but for shooting these risks can be managed, mitigated or eradicated with targeted and proportionate measures. Such measures include compliance with the law on the use of lead shot, the Code of Good Shooting Practice, adherence to Food Standards Agency advice and effective processing by those who handle game meat. The evidence shows that proper processing of game meat eradicates the risk. BASC will continue to work with sister organisations and statutory agencies for compliance with the law on the use of lead shot.

References:

Law on lead ammunition

Code of Good Shooting Practice

FSA advice

Lead Ammunition Q&A

For specific advice on game shooting matters please contact us on: 01244 573019  email

Lead

Yes. The representative for the shooting organisations on the LAG is currently Sir Barney White Spunner, the Executive Chairman of the Countryside Alliance.

The independent Chairman of the LAG is John Swift. He is not employed by BASC and is no longer a member. He does not represent BASC.

No. The LAG’s remit is to advise the Department for the Environment and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Food Standards Agency (FSA) on the “key risks to wildlife from lead ammunition, the respective levels of those risks and to explore possible solutions to any significant risks; and possible options for managing the risk to human health from the increased exposure to lead as a result of using lead ammunition”.

Full terms of reference for the group can be found here.

No. BASC’s policy is “no sound evidence, no change.” BASC has rigorously tested all evidence produced against lead ammunition. It has held politicians and regulators to account, demanding that they only act on sound evidence and in accordance with the principles of better regulation.

BASC’s full policy on lead ammunition can be found here.

These emails are expressions of opinion. They represent exchanges of views and do not reflect any formal report. No report has been agreed by LAG, no report has been seen by the members of LAG and no report has been sent to government by LAG.

No. While some antis are campaigning for a ban, government have no proposals to do so and no political party has a policy to ban.

No they do not. Any advice from LAG is not binding on Defra or the FSA.

Yes. Any recommendations that would require a change in the law on lead ammunition will involve discussions in government, consultation with stakeholders including BASC, public consultation and could involve debate in parliament.

No. Defra or the FSA may propose a change to the law but this would have to be agreed by all government departments and be laid before parliament for MPs and Peers to have their say.

Yes. BASC already briefs MPs and Peers on a range of issues affecting shooting such as lead ammunition.

You can support all shooting organisations’ calls for shooters to comply with the law on lead ammunition.

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