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BASC has released a film to help wildfowlers stay safe on the marsh.

The five-minute long film, entitled Safety on the Marsh, highlights the risks of the activity if you fail to prepare properly.

Marshes and the foreshore can be dangerous places without the correct knowledge to navigate them properly and wildfowlers can often also find themselves at the peril of the weather, which as well as being a problem in itself, can affect the height and timing of tides.

Paul Williamson, BASC’s rural land development manager, said: “We always urge our members to take time out to prepare before they go out for a day on the marsh. The last thing we want is for anyone to get caught out by the weather or conditions and put themselves at risk.

“As stated in the video ‘fail to prepare, prepare to fail’.”

John Dryden, a member of BASC Council and chairman of the association’s wildfowling liaison committee, said: “Be safe out there, you owe it to yourself and your family. Like the best Scouts, it pays to be prepared.”

Top tips to stay safe:

• Make sure you know the safe access and exit routes, marsh boundaries and any inherent dangers, for example, areas of soft mud or sand.
• Always consult tide tables before going onto the marsh. Make any necessary adjustments for location and if British Summer Time is in operation add one hour to GMT. Remember that the height and timing of tides is affected by the prevailing weather conditions both locally and out to sea. In certain conditions this can mean that the tide can be several feet higher and appear hours earlier than predicted.
• Always tell someone when and where you have gone wildfowling, and do not forget to tell them that you have returned safely.
• Always plan your exit route, particularly when a big tide is expected. Never wait until the last moment to leave the marsh when the incoming tide is approaching. Channels fill quickly and in a very short time they become a torrent. You can easily be cut off by creeks flooding behind you.

Click here to watch the full video. 

Click here for more information about wildfowling and staying safe on the marsh. 

ENDS

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