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More than 1,400 schoolchildren will take to the moors of northern England this week to learn all about the uplands, the unique species that live there and the custodians who protect and conserve it.

Let’s Learn Moor will take place at seven locations across Yorkshire, Lancashire, the Peak District and the northern Pennines between July 1st and 5th.

Now in its third year, the aim of the project is to offer an outdoor experience to children.

The aim of each day is to showcase the habitats, species, communities and organisations that live and work in, and help to protect, the uplands.

Gamekeepers, farmers, members of the emergency services and conservation organisations which protect and manage the area will be on hand to talk to the children about their roles.

The project involves over thirty organisations in total including police forces, national parks and various wildlife organisations.

Gareth Dockerty, BASC north regional officer, said: “Children will learn how the moors are home to weird insect-eating plants, sponge-like mosses and soaring birds of prey.

“They will meet hardy upland sheep, play games, learn about iconic birds like the bent beaked curlew and find out how the mountain rescue teams save lives.

“They will follow the journey of water from tiny upland streams to their tap at home and learn how the moors are managed for communities, visitors and wildlife.”

BASC chairman Eoghan Cameron said: “This year Let’s Learn Moor is bigger than ever before, with 1,400 children attending events at seven locations across the north of England. This is a positive, inclusive project that offers children an unforgettable day of experiences and an education that will stay with them for life.

“Let’s Learn Moor would not be possible without the support of the regional moorland groups who have helped organise each event and bring the partner organisations together.

“Thanks also to Countryside Learning who have supported the project from the start and championed our inclusive approach.

“The willingness for gamekeepers and estates to host these events shows clearly how seriously they take their role as part of the community and their responsibility to ensure the moors provide for their communities and nature.”

Funding for the events has been provided by BASC, the Moorland Association and the Moorland Communities Trust.

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