Trapping and Snaring in Scotland

What you need to know

Currently:

All snares must be free-running and have a fixed stop at the appropriate distance.

All set snares must be checked every day at intervals of no more than 24 hours.

All set snares must be staked to the ground or attached to an object to prevent the snare from being dragged.

Snares must not be set where an animal caught by the snare may become fully or partially suspended or drown.

Anyone wishing to set snares must be accredited and also have their operator ID number.

Anyone who passed the accreditation course prior to May 2010 will need to contact their accreditation body and request a new certificate before applying for their operator ID number.

Tags featuring the ID number will need to be fitted to snares.

Snare operators will be obliged to keep snaring records.

BASC Scotland will be running a number of accreditation courses throughout Scotland. For more information on snaring or if you are interested in doing a snaring accreditation course, please contact the BASC Scotland.

Snaring in Scotland – a practitioners’ guide (fourth edition), a booklet covering all aspects of snaring legislation and best practice, is available on request from BASC Scotland.

Snaring in Scotland – A Practitioners’ Guide December 2012

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