BASC provides the facts on Greenland white-fronted geese

White fronted goose by northeastwildlife.co.ukBASC has produced an infographic highlighting key facts on Greenland white-fronted geese following the Welsh government’s public consultation on a shooting ban.

BASC, the UK’s largest shooting organisation, has urged continued support for the alliance between wildfowlers and bird conservation bodies in the hope of maintaining the status quo by keeping the geese on the quarry list.

The infographic highlights that a voluntary shooting moratorium has been effective for 44 years and claims a continuation of this approach is good for conservation and therefore a good use of public funds.

BASC is urging members to use facts and figures from the infographic as a guide when contacting candidates for the forthcoming Welsh Assembly elections to seek their views on this and shooting in general.

Gary Ashton, BASC director Wales, said: “Although this consultation period came to an end in March, BASC would urge members to continue to lobby prospective Assembly Members through the BASC website. It is important that decision-makers are fully appraised of the evidence surrounding white-fronted geese.

“Taking this species off the quarry list in Wales has no material benefit and is not a responsible use of public funds. We urge the government to continue supporting the voluntary shooting moratorium observed by wildfowlers in Wales.”

For the preparation of its paper ‘Promoting the conservation of white-fronted geese in Wales’, the government sought views on either removing the geese from the quarry list (options 1-4) or continuing to support a voluntary ban on shooting them (option 5).

BASC’s response was in support of option 5; wildfowlers have had a long-standing voluntary moratorium on shooting the geese with the association’s members playing a key role in programmes to improve their over-wintering success.

“If the Welsh government wishes to improve the status of white-fronted geese in Wales, then it should continue to invest in research and habitat work to ensure birds return to breeding grounds in Greenland in the best possible condition.”

To access the infographic, click the link below. For a copy of BASC’s briefing and consultation response click here. To seek the views of your local candidates on shooting, click here.

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